HAVE YOU HEARD?

There’s no question about it, Wood Rodgers has the best facilities in the business! This is in huge part to our dedicated facilities team!

The purpose of World Facilities Management Day is to recognize and celebrate the vital work that workplace and facilities managers and the wider industry contributes to business worldwide. It aims to raise the profile of the facilities profession anywhere that its practitioners influence the health, safety, productivity, and wellbeing of people who use the built environment.

We asked some of our Facilities Management Team some questions, and this is what they had to say!

Buck Mercer – Facilities Supervisor

How did you get into your field?

“Stuart Von Lewis got me the interview, but I am pretty sure someone lost a bet and had to hire me.”

What is your favorite part of your job?

“Wood Rodgers Facilities Department covers a wide range of tasks and activities. Everyday is something different. The variety is challenging and rewarding at the same time.”

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into your field?

“Learn as much as you can through experience. Once you find one or two things that are interesting, school up on them, but keep your hands learning as well.”

What is your favorite part of working at Wood Rodgers?

“Learning from the other operations departments (IT, Corporate Communications, Accounting and Administration), and utilizing that knowledge within the more traditional roles of a Facilities/Fleet Department. Doing some of the routine tasks that keep Wood Rodgers moving along without interruption, always with the goal of doing them better the next time.”

Trey Powell – Facilities Coordinator

How did you get into your field?

“I was always hands on while growing up always helped my dad with many projects and that lead to starting in the construction field.”

What is your favorite part of your job?

“My favorite part of the job is being able to find solutions to problems.”

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into your field?

“Learn the value of hard work by working hard.”

What is your favorite part of working at Wood Rodgers?

“I have felt like I work with a big family.”

Beau Katolin – Facilities Technician

How did you get into your field?

“I was made aware of the open position through my girlfriend. I strive for positions where I get to work/build with my hands, so I applied for the job.”

What is your favorite part of your job?

“I like building, fixing, and installing various things with my hands and getting to see the end product of my work.”

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into your field?

“It is a smart choice because you will learn non perishable skills.”

What is your favorite part of working at Wood Rodgers?

“It is a very open and welcoming company to work for.”

Sarah Valdez – Fleet Coordinator

How did you get into your field?

“I was referred by a colleague.”

What is your favorite part of your job?

“I’m still new, so right now I’m enjoying learning all of the things Wood Rodgers has to offer.”

Do you have any advice for someone looking to get into your field?

“Go for it!”

What is your favorite part of working at Wood Rodgers?

“I like the sense of community and the team I work with.”

Wood Rodgers recently won an award for “Outstanding Geotechnical Engineering Project” from the American Society Of Civil Engineers Region 9 for its part on the Goldfields 200 Year Levee Project.

The 200-year Goldfields Levee Project overcame many challenges including navigating complex land ownership and history, modeling complex hydraulic conditions, and mitigating under seepage in a complex geologic setting. The project also considered social impacts to the local community, economy, and ecology. The timely project completion has led to increase flood safety of Linda, Olivehurst, Arboga, and Plumas Lake combined with maximizing future mining and agriculture uses.

The project resolved legacy issues with the State Reclamation Board and State Plan of Flood Control. The former Linda Levee extended from the Yuba River South Levee across the Yuba Goldfields. A 1948 agreement allowed the Linda Levee to be removed for gold mining and replaced with a tailings mound barrier at the south end of the Yuba Goldfields. However, the tailings mound was not added to the State Plan of Flood Control, effectively limiting State cost sharing of 200-year flood control solutions within the Yuba Goldfields. The construction of the 200-year Goldfields Levee Project resolved this legacy issue.

Much of the project area and adjacent areas to the northeast are permitted for aggregate mining, including the Yuba Goldfields. The mining operations provide jobs and are a critical component to the local economy in Marysville. By constructing a significant portion of the levee adjacent to Hammonton-Smartville Road, the project had reduced impacts to future mining activities in the areas just north of the levee. The geotechnical evaluation even incorporated potential future mining ponds on the waterside of the levee to ensure that the levee would remain safe without having to restrict mining activities.

We asked some of the engineers who worked on the project some questions, and this is what they said!

Marisol Contreras – Assistant Engineer

What did you do on the Project?

“I helped on some submittals, request for information, field instructions, and mostly the record drawings.”

What was your favorite part of the project?

“My favorite part about the project was working closely with my dad and learning all his skills that he uses on water resource project. I never worked on water resource until this project and what really helped me to understand this side of industry was all of Carlos lectures and teachings.”

What was the most challenging part of the project?

“The most challenging part of the project was sorting through the quality testing and understanding what information they where giving us.”

 

 

 

Jesse Meza – Assistant Engineer

What did you do on the Project?

“My primary task was reviewing pre-construction, construction, and post-construction surveys. I also assisted with construction support documentation review, field inspection, earthwork quantities review, and record drawing preparation.”

What was your favorite part of the project?

“My favorite part of the project was working with the WR team. The dynamic was great and even when the workload was heavy, we were able to keep things fun and interesting.”

What was the most challenging part of the project?

“Interpreting the survey information we received from the contractor was the biggest challenge for me. Although we set up an effective method to organize incoming surveys early in the project, the review wasn’t always straightforward due to missing information and/or other discrepancies. We often went beyond our duties to complete reviews and address concerns.”

Any other comments?

“Carlos did a great job mentoring the rest of the WR team. He provided one-on-one survey review guidance, broke down the purpose of individual tasks for my understanding, and shared insight about lessons learned over the course of the project. Working on this project felt like a learning experience more so than it felt like work.”

Josh Kaup – Assistant Engineer

What did you do on the Project?

“I was onsite to observe and document construction activities to ensure the Contractor was meeting contract requirements, and provide reviews for project submittals, requests for information (RFIs), and contract change order requests. I also provided support in any project design changes throughout construction, and supported Carlos with Construction Management duties that included leading project and team meetings, coordinating construction activities, and providing Quality Assurance for features of work.”

What was your favorite part of the project?

“My favorite part of the project was being able to see the construction of a brand new levee from the ground up. What originally started as an orchard of trees, became a 2.5 mile stretch of levee. It felt like we created something that will provide safety from flooding events for future generations to come. Also, being a part of a great and fun team. Having our Wood Rodgers team members around to support each other made it all the more enjoyable.”

What was the most challenging part of the project?

“The most challenging aspect for us at Wood Rodgers was providing construction management for a levee project for the first time in nearly a decade for the Water Resources group, but also for the first time for anyone on this project team. We learned throughout the project, but looking back on our experiences we will be able to carry on to the next project with what we learned and do our best to establish Wood Rodgers as a reliable construction manager for clients.”

 

Carlos Contreras – Senior Engineer

What did you do on the Project?

“I was the Design Engineer and Construction Manager/Resident Engineer during construction.”

What was your favorite part of the project?

“My favorite part of the project was working with our Wood Rodgers Team to create a project that could be used as a benchmark for other Water Resource engineers. Our Water Resource department has designed many flood improvement features over the years but this project was our first to take it through Construction Management. Our Team used current Wood Rodgers standards and tools to distribute and communicate the project design features and construction requirements.”

What was the most challenging part of the project?

“The most challenging part of the project was building trust with the full construction team. Everyone brought their own construction experience to the project and each had their own specialty that the project required. When our construction documents conflicted with the contractors typical procedures the Construction Management Team was required to work with the contractor to better understanding specification requirements. All parties needed to trust that there was no hidden agenda and open to providing solutions.”

Any other comments?

“The Wood Rodgers Construction Management Team worked hard and put in many hours to meet the project requirements. But just like any good team even with all the challenges we had to overcome we still found time to learn from each challenge and were able to stay positive that all the hard work will pay off.”

 

Wood Rodgers Moves Up on ENR’s Top Design Firms List

Wood Rodgers is proud to announce that we have again been recognized by the Engineering News Record (ENR) for 2022. Wood Rodgers moved up 29 spots this year, from #253 in 2021 to #224 for this year on the ENR’s Top Design Firms list. The Top Design Firm List ranked nearly 500 construction and engineering firms across the nation, with some including international offices across the world. Many of these firms are large, publicly held, firms with some having over 50,000 employees. We are proud that our 350+ employee firm was able to rank amongst all those firms.

ENR is a highly recognized publication that compiles a comprehensive list of construction and engineering firms based on annual income and we are honored to be one of those recognized firms, demonstrating our continued success. A large part of that success is directly attributed to our new and continued client base, along with the expansion of our services and key regional hires.

“Just 25 years ago two guys had a vision to do something different. That unique vision has led us to #224 this year and will continue to guide us in the years to come.”, as stated by Mark Rayback, President.

 

We recently took a trip out to the City of Colfax with Senior Engineer Jim Fletter! We joined Jim on his inspection of the Colfax Water Treatment Plant Storage Reservoir Dam #2022. We asked Jim to tell us a little more about what exactly it is he was doing and why he was doing it. This is what he had to say!

Jim Fletter, PE, QSP/QSD – Senior Engineer

“The City of Colfax operates and maintains a jurisdictional dam at their wastewater treatment plant.  A dam is jurisdictional if is above certain heights and impounds more that a certain volume of water.  Jurisdiction dams are regulated by the California Department of Water Resources through the Department of Safety of Dams (DSOD).  The Colfax dam is jurisdictional because it is about 60 feet high and impounds about 200 acre-feet of water.  DSOD monitors all jurisdictional dams by requiring the dam owner to submit annually an instrumentation survey report.  These reports include data about dam movement, seepage through and under the dam, as well as visual inspection.  The Colfax dam has five settlement monuments, two to either side of the dam face (groins) and three along the face toward the top.  The monuments are surveyed once a year to track horizontal and vertical movement.  Piezometers in the face of the dam are measured monthly to track the height of any water passing through the dam.  Groundwater at the face of the dam is measured weekly to track the amount of water flowing through and under the dam.  In the report, this information is compared to daily precipitation and water surface level to identify anomalies that might indicate that the stability of the dam is changing and warrants further study.

 

When I am inspecting the dam, I am check that the settlement monuments remain well anchored (no erosion, sliding, undermining by animal activity or vandalism).  I am also looking at the vegetation maintenance and for signs of surface defects linked animal activity (borrows), erosion or landslides.  The Colfax dam is surfaced with a relatively thick layer of shale mined from the nearby hills during construction and it has remained stable since it was built in the late 1970s.”

Today, we’re celebrating World Landscape Architecture Month here at Wood Rodgers!

Landscape Architecture combines art and science. It is the profession that plans and manages our land. Landscape Architects plan and design traditional places such as parks, residential developments, campuses, gardens, cemeteries, commercial centers, resorts, transportation facilities, corporate and institutional centers and waterfront developments. They also plan the restoration of natural places disturbed by humans such as wetlands, stream corridors, mined areas, and forest land. Their appreciation for historic landscapes and cultural resources enables landscape architects to undertake preservation planning projects for national, regional, and local historic sites and areas.

We asked some of our Landscape Architects a few questions, and this is what they had to say!

Maribel Arellano – Assistant Landscape Architect

What is landscape architecture?

“Landscape Architecture is the planning, design, and nurturing of our natural environments. It improves our interaction and brings communities together to enjoy the outdoors!”

What does landscape architecture mean to you?

“It’s a way of expression through design. It nurtures and impacts our communities in very different ways but in these times, the outdoors has become an even greater way to bring mental health to our communities by impacting their daily lives through our designs.”

What inspired you to get involved in Landscape Architecture?

“I have always gravitated towards the arts and design and I’m happy to have learned about Landscape Architecture! I love that I get to make things beautiful and enrich other peoples lives through design.”

Do you have advice on someone looking to get into Landscape Architecture?

“Landscape Architects are big picture thinkers and have the ability to collaborate with others. If you have been considering getting into the field of Landscape Architecture, I would suggest to take an architecture class, drafting class in HS if offered. You also need to care for plants!”

Connor Waters – Assistant Landscape Architect

What is landscape architecture?

“Landscape architecture is more than what it seems – meaning it touches on everything we see in out outdoor built environments. It is what I like to call the jack of all trades profession, as we have knowledge in so many different field. From plants, to irrigation, to construction, landscape architecture has the ability of presenting itself highly useful in any project.”

What does landscape architecture mean to you?

“Landscape architecture means challenging the way I look at landscapes. Beautifying the landscape has always been a huge reason as to why I chose this profession, but I think the most meaningful projects have history and purpose as the main drivers behind the design. Creating something with purpose, for the benefit of everyone is what landscape architecture means to me.”

What inspired you to get involved in Landscape Architecture?

“My interests in art, design, the environment, planting, and water conservation have always been huge interests of mine. When I stumbled upon this career, it seemed like a perfect fir for all of my many interests!”

Do you have advice on someone looking to get into Landscape Architecture?

“I would say, try as many aspects of the profession as you can! Get involved in clubs, go guerilla planting with friends, challenge forms and functional items. There are so many different ways we can re-invent our surroundings to enhance our experiences. I would also say think outside the box. Using things that people don’t normally think about in landscapes, such as smells or interactive pieces are key ways to create dynamic spaces.”

Kathryn Kim – Associate Landscape Architect

What is landscape architecture?

“Landscape Architecture is the shaping of both the built and the natural environment to enhance and meet the needs of it’s community.”

What does landscape architecture mean to you?

“To me, landscape architecture is the introduction and integration of greenspace into the built environment. It encompasses everything outside of buildings walls, including buildings walls and roofs.”

What inspired you to get involved in Landscape Architecture?

“Fun fact, I was actually accepted to UC Davis as civil engineering student. I’ve always loved design and I’m a bit of a math nerd. After siting through orientation, I knew engineering would not be a good fit for me. I grew up in the country and was active in FFA, raising animals and gardening with grandma. I knew there had to be something that had a little bit of everything I enjoy. And that’s when I discovered Landscape Architecture.”

Do you have advice on someone looking to get into Landscape Architecture?

“Be active as a student. Join ASLA. Apply to internships. Volunteer. Landscape Architecture encompasses so many different specialties that I can guarantee you will find something you will enjoy.”

 

Matthew Belanger – Assistant Landscape Architect

What is landscape architecture?

“Landscape Architecture is the professional practice of land manipulation to provide purposeful places to benefit all who encompass them.”

What does landscape architecture mean to you?

“It means a lot! I have grown to appreciate the practice on a deeper level as you start to understand the built environment. The most rewarding experience is seeing others use the landscaped design in a way you intended, to bring community and joy.”

What inspired you to get involved in Landscape Architecture?

“I always liked being creative and hoped to make a living doing it. Landscape Architecture provided an outlet and a professional career to scratch my creative itch, but also an opportunity to give back. Having had a backyard which I spent most of my time in growing up, I realize how necessary and important good design is in giving back.”

Do you have advice on someone looking to get into Landscape Architecture?

“Go for it! Find a University with an accredited degree program in Landscape Architecture, and call the school to figure out what the first steps are. Don’t be afraid to push your creativity, take chances, and believe you can make a difference, because you can and will.”

John Nicolaus, FASLA – Principal Landscape Architect

What is landscape architecture?

“The art and science of creating outdoor built environments in all manner of settings, from rural/natural, to urban. This is also balanced with being a ‘steward of the land’, meaning that we are professionally entrusted to care for our earth, its systems, and the people who use them.”

What does landscape architecture mean to you?

“It’s a livelihood, and a way of life. By way of life, I mean it’s how I use, and try to conserve, resources of all kinds in my personal and professional lives or how I enjoy the outdoors in its many, many different forms. It’s also how I share my knowledge with folks who may not have considered how their outdoors was created, both naturally and man made. In the outdoor built environment, absolutely everything we see was placed there intentionally by someone. Most people blow past that, but once they learn it, they are amazed at the complexities of the world around us.”

What inspired you to get involved in Landscape Architecture?

“My parents, and my love of design and gardening. When I was in high school, I didn’t know what a landscape architect was, but I was guided to find out and knew when I was 16 years old that this was what I wanted to be.”

Do you have advice on someone looking to get into Landscape Architecture?

“Talk with a lot of designers…any kind of (visual) designer, and find out what they do and how their work impacts the built world around us. Talk with landscape architects and find out what kind of work they do – there are so many paths this journey can take, from the more technical and scientific, to environmental justice, to pure design, and those can be applied to every scale of project. There really is something for everyone who’s interested in this field. And something for everyone who wants to positively impact the world around them.”

 

Learn more about World Landscape Architecture Day at https://www.asla.org/wlam2022.aspx

We recently asked some of our Engineering staff what their advice for students would be.

This is what Gregory Garrison, one of our Assistant Engineers in Sacramento, had to say!

High School Students: “Your grades from Freshman year through Senior year all matter! Extracurricular activities, sports, leadership, clubs on campus, Boy Scouts, volunteering; all matter when applying for college. Do all that you can. You will begin touring colleges Junior year of high school. Maybe with parents and/or with friends. First, think to yourself, would I like to live here for 3-5 years? Will I be happy? Secondly, think to yourself, is there enough diversity in activities that you could do outside of school? For example, sports, hiking, carpentry, habitat for humanity, fraternities, etc. Your happiness in and outside of the classroom can make or break your growth. So don’t just select a college because people told you it was prestigious! When touring colleges, be observant, look around. See how the classrooms are filled. Check to see how large the labs are. Ask about research opportunities. Ask your future classmates, what are classes like, how are the professors, and the student chapters. Then once you have a good understanding of the programs offered, ask students of all grades, “What is the one thing you know now that you wished you knew as an incoming Freshman?” All these questions could help you determine where to go. Just remember, the next 4-5 years of your life will shape you to be the best candidate for future employers. Lastly, research the job growth in the field you sign up for. Is the college in a region, like the “Silicon Valley” or the State Capital, where there is lots of potential for after graduation or will you have to relocate once graduating?”

College Students: “Each and everyday in a college will be an experience. Some days will be tough, others will be a breeze. Don’t just coast through school and get good grades. Branch out, meet people, join clubs and organizations on campus and/or in your chosen field. If there isn’t a student chapter on college that you want to join, reach out to the local professional chapter and ask, “how do I create a student chapter and/or become active in the professional chapter as a college student?” Building connections is a solid way for you to learn more about the industry you want to join. You never know, these connections could lead to internships…”

Today, we’re celebrating World Water Day here at Wood Rodgers! Groundwater is a very precious resource, and we are doing everything in our power to keep groundwater available for generations to come! While groundwater is invisible, it’s impact is visible everywhere! Our drinking water and sanitation, our food supply, and natural environment – all these rely on groundwater. While groundwater has always been critically important to human society and ecosystems, it hasn’t been fully recognized. Groundwater must be at the heart of sustainable development policymaking.

Read more about some people on our team working on making the world a better place for all!

Sean Spaeth, PG, CHG – Senior Hydrogeologist

Why did you get into Water Resources?

“Since high school, I knew I wanted to work with water in some way or fashion. It wasn’t until I was introduced to geology from a good friend in college that I learned that water not only exists in streams and lakes, but it is also underground. Keep in mind, this is pre-internet age.”

How does groundwater affect your life?

“Groundwater plays an important part of my life; my career is centered around it. More importantly, groundwater plays an integral part of our everyday world. From the obvious of providing for drinking water but also providing for habitat (where it flows from the ground surface) and irrigation water for our food. The most spectacular example of groundwater that i have seen at Burney Falls northeast of Redding.”

Is there enough groundwater?

“The question should be: Is there enough fresh groundwater? The answer – No. But, there are ways to maximize its existence and identify the sustainable use of the resource. There are also ways to augment and attempt to restore the natural existence of groundwater (to pre-development conditions).”

Is groundwater safe?

“This is relative, in that treatment technologies exist that can remove harmful chemicals from groundwater. Ideally, groundwater should not need to be treated in order to consume; but there are both naturally occurring chemicals in groundwater and those introduced through industry we need to be aware of. With regard to industry – we don’t know what is in the groundwater if we don’t know what to look for.”

What needs to be done to protect groundwater?

“Overall, increasing awareness of the resource. This includes an understanding of what is applied to the ground surface has a very high probability of entering the groundwater system and secondly, we can not pump more out of the system than is returned each year. Increasing monitoring for changes in groundwater quality and levels is the first step, and one that the State of California is currently implementing through its Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA).”

Julie Garofalo, PG, CHG – Project Hydrogeologist

Why did you get into Water Resources?

“If you live in California, you know that water is worth more than gold. Living in a rural farming community, I understand how important it is to protect and preserve our water resources so we can continue our way of life for many generations to come. In my current job as a Hydrogeologist, I find it very rewarding to be able to help clients achieve their water supply goals, and to do it in a sustainable manner.”

How does groundwater affect your life?

“I live in a rural farming community in northern California, and I have seen the effects that multi-year drought has on our ag industry. Farming clients are faced with many challenges, such as reduce surface water supply, an increased reliance on groundwater, and developing groundwater sources in areas that have previously been “untapped.” Being in the groundwater industry, my work has allowed me to develop a deep appreciation for the amount of work that goes into growing a crop. It is so much more involved than just turning on the tap to water the plants.”

Is there enough groundwater?

“Groundwater availability widely varies throughout the state of California. The groundwater subbasins throughout the state have unique hydrogeologic conditions, including groundwater levels and trends, water quality, and land subsidence, to name a few. Although some subbasins may have relatively stable groundwater level trends over the long-term, some subbasins are experiencing overdraft, or chronic lowering of groundwater levels. This is why our water delivery system is so important, to move water supplies around to different areas where and when it is needed the most. With the implementation of SGMA, local water users will need to work together to help achieve sustainability in their subbasin, to ensure that the groundwater resource can continue providing sustainable supply to our farming and municipal entities.”

Is groundwater safe?

“Generally speaking, groundwater is safe. However, there are both naturally-occurring and anthropogenic water quality issues throughout the state of California. The water quality can vary significantly by depth, and also laterally. That is where our water well experts here at Wood Rodgers come into play. We assess the local hydrogeologic conditions and design programs to develop groundwater by specifying where to drill, and how deep to go to have the best chance of meeting our clients’ water capacity and quality objectives.”

What needs to be done to protect groundwater?

“Innovation is really going to be the key to protecting our groundwater resource well into the future. To ensure sustainability, I think it will become imperative that water users develop solutions to conserve water, store water, and to recharge water back into the ground to replenish the aquifers. Education will also be key. The relationship between water well drillers, local permitting agencies, and professional groundwater experts in the industry will need to be strengthened to verify that wells are being drilled and constructed in a manner that will preserve the quality and integrity of our aquifer systems.”

Jonathan Kors – Vice President; Sac Water Group Manager

Why did you get into Water Resources?

“I was hired into it when I was looking to get out of the General Contracting world back in 1997. I didn’t initially set out to be in water. However, I figured that public infrastructure would probably always be a good business to be in. And it has been.”

How does groundwater affect your life?

“I live on City water but have property for which I had a well constructed last year. I got to experience first hand the anxiety of drilling deeper and deeper hoping to hit a good source of water. Finally did so at 575 feet (30gpm).”

Is there enough groundwater?

“No. Its been unregulated for years and is still a modern day “wild-west” in some places. Whomever has the deeper straw and stronger suction system wins.”

Is groundwater safe?

“That depends on if you have hired Wood Rodgers to take samples and test the source!”

What needs to be done to protect groundwater?

“We need more surface water infrastructure to capture large storm events in reservoirs; projects that incorporate storm water capture and groundwater recharge together; and strong regulations to prevent the over-taxation of the groundwater resource.”

 

Learn more about World Water Day at https://www.worldwaterday.org/

Today, March 21st 2022, is Global Surveyors’ Day! It also happens to be National Surveyors’ Week here in the USA! We interviewed a couple members of our Survey Team to see what they like about Surveying!

Andrew P. Tapley – Project Surveyor

Why/how did you get into Surveying?

“I was a carpenter & construction contractor and wanted to make a career change but still wanted to work outdoors, if possible.”

What was your career path to get into Surveying?

“Bought an AutoCAD for dummies book and went to work for brother-in-law who owned an engineering company. He wanted to add surveying to services provided so he got his PLS and I worked, as his only employee, in the field and office, doing mostly topographic and construction staking surveys.”

What is your favorite part of Surveying?

“The fact that surveying uses so many cutting edge technologies today but has been around for so long, it was cutting edge surveying technology that allowed the Egyptians to build the pyramids.”

What is your advice for anyone looking to get into Surveying?

“Brush up on your math & geometry, wear a lot of sunscreen, bring lots of water and wear some hiking shoes.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Detwiler – Project Surveyor

Why/how did you get into Surveying?

“A bit by accident, but I was drawn to the ability to work outdoors.”

What was your career path to get into Surveying?

“I had a lot of on the job learning and training first. Then went back to school to get the education.”

What is your favorite part of Surveying?

“My favorite part is the mix of office and field work.”

What is your advice for anyone looking to get into Surveying?

“Don’t be intimidated that you need a bunch of education and degrees to work. Many surveyors learn on the job first, like a trade, but gain formal education later on in their career.”

We’d like to wish Paul Roulias a happy 5 year anniversary here at Wood Rodgers! Paul is a Assistant Surveyor in our Reno office. Thanks for being a part of our team!

What have you liked best about your time at Wood Rodgers and why?

“Wood Rodgers seems to care about employees and balancing what is viewed as important in the corporate world as well as what is important to employees happiness. Wood Rodgers has been able to be flexible, resilient and dynamic. I believe that this also helps employees follow the same path. Wood Rodgers cares about compensating employees for their hard work and dedication as much as it cares about it’s own profit margins. Wood Rodgers is willing to allow capable and productive employees to be flexible with their schedules and to continue to partially work remotely. “Happy employees are productive employees.””

What is your favorite Memory at Wood Rodgers?

“Wood Rodgers has thrown some good company events/parties. Going bowling after a NALS Conference with Mike Long, Kevin Almeter, Michael Detwiler and Eric Rice was a hilarious memory and one of my favorites.”

Do you have a Favorite Project you’ve worked on? If so, what is it and why?

“It is hard to nail down a favorite project, there have been so many. I enjoy challenging projects and working those , especially in other departments, that are respectful of what we do and have good coordination and communication skills.”

We’d like to wish our very own co-founder, Mark Rodgers, a happy 25 year anniversary here at Wood Rodgers! We asked him a few questions about his time here since he founded Wood Rodgers.

How does it feel to make it to 25 years at Wood Rodgers?

“It feels like I’m really old now………. I started the company when I was 41. The math tells it all. However, we have made it through all the good and bad times, and the good seriously outweighs any of the bad. We have helped and enriched many people’s lives whether staff, client or through our relationships with others in the industry. Actually, it’s amazing considering that Rich Wood and I learned the business of business on the fly. I am proud that we have created a great company for all.”

What have you liked best about your journey here at Wood Rodgers?

“Being a part of building a most excellent company that cares about their people and is known for outstanding work and cool attitudes.”

What is your favorite Memory at Wood Rodgers?

“Too many to count. But I do remember the early years in the basement. We bought a used conference table with 6-chairs and put it in the lobby of the basement. I just sat there for the longest time and thought about how cool it was to have a conference room with comfy chairs and a cool table. We were in the big leagues. I could not wait to have a meeting, and we did. The ammonia / old Brownie Blueprint machine we got that they were throwing out is a whole other story……… You gotta be ancient to understand what happens when they break. Kind of creates a hazmat problem…..Evacuated the Victorian building a couple of times.”

Do you have a Favorite Project you’ve worked on? If so, what is it and why?

“The company line is that they are all my favorite projects. All I can say is that over the years, I’ve built a bunch of communities, helped a bunch of people, and have done it with a bit of a different style. I like arriving at unique solutions for unique projects.”